Author Archives: Abi

About Abi

My name is T. A. Abinandanan, and I am a professor of Materials Engineering at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.

Electric Charge, Surfactants, Bubble Nucleation, and …

… Boiling of Water! Here’s a neat video about the work. Here’s a quote from an MIT News story on the research: “The whole concept relies on the fact that whether a surface is hydrophobic or hydrophilic will affect the … Continue reading

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A Computational Look into Melting Predicts a Very High Melting Compound

This paper from Axel van de Walle’s group sounds interesting: Researchers predict material with record-setting melting point [see also this WaPo story]: The experimental record-holder is a substance made from the elements hafnium, tantalum, and carbon (Hf-Ta-C). But these new … Continue reading

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Microstructures are everywhere!

The backstory behind this stunning, prize-winning image is as interesting as the image itslef, which is from a half-millimeter sized splatter of water on a silicon chip, almost at its edge.

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Richard J. Light: “How to Live Wisely”

Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Richard Light talks about an interesting seminar/discussion course in his NYTimes column. The short course (more like a module running into several sessions) is built around a set of exercises which make the students not … Continue reading

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Chemical energy!

Suppose a typical modern family car does about 40 miles to the gallon or, in metric terms, 100 km for every 7 litres of fuel. That means if you have a teaspoon of petrol (about 0.004 litres), it contains enough … Continue reading

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Large scale pattern formation

A great article in Wired — Earth’s Most Stunning Natural Fractal Patterns by Jess McNally — is on patterns at human scales (leaves, cephalopods, peacock feathres, broccoli), as well as at hugely supra-human scales (mountains, rivers, waterfalls, and lightning). It … Continue reading

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Materials in Apple Watch

Here’s a fine piece — How Apple Makes the Watch — on the materials (specidfically, gold, stainless steel and aluminum) and processes which go into making several key (but non-electronic) components of Apple watch. It uses publicity videos from Apple … Continue reading

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